Loading...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Menu
 
 
 
Community Updates

2014 IACCM Annual Americas Conference - Chicago

We are currently developing the 2014 IACCM Americas Forum Agenda - and we'll announce the full program in Q2 of 2014. But, we've upgraded this event and we think you'll like it...We recognize the importance of providing you with ‘how-to’ information and allowing you to benchmark against best practices…IACCM Forums equip you with thought leadership, technical insights and actionable information on how to simplify and manage your interactions with trading partners.We help our members - the contracting, legal and sourcing communities - manage change, deliver value and create agility through the way business relationships are formed and managed within their complex markets and supply chains.Here's what to expect form the 2014 Forum:Networking -- only one of many opportunities awaiting you -- could open a door into your future success story! It’s about exchanging ideas.  Going deeper into best strategies. No textbook can beat it.  No Iphone, or internet or email works better than getting to know colleagues in other organizations. Marriot O'Hare, Chicago; an affordable location! Get there faster - a short 5 mile complimentary shuttle, subway ($2.25) or taxi ride ($15 one way) from Chicago O'Hare airport Breakfast, lunch and refreshment breaks included on all days plus a reception on day 1 and dinner on day 2! Spend less - IACCM Group rates are $179 + taxes and services per night. Internet included in group rate - to book click here before September 29 2014. No talking heads Hear fantastic speakers - all subject matter and/or practitioner experts Learn quickly - only 1 intro slide to set the stage and 3 actions to take with you Get 10 new insights or actions in 20 minutes (Quick tips sessions!) Intimate learning & structured networking opportunities New closed boardroom sessions - 25 participants maximum, discussion format More discussion roundtables Strategic transformation & cross-functional alignment discussion groups to help you elevate your function Interactive networking session and New mentoring program – great opportunity to express insights and advance your skills, whether as mentor or protégé Exhibit hall demos during networking breaks Many unstructured networking opportunities Welcome reception, day 2 dinner for all attendees, networking breaks Bonus feature Workshops and Academic Forum sessions now included in your pass (at no additional cost) for more tangible learning We guarantee you will get all this! More balance between buy/sell, pre/post session focus New IACCM research findings & initiatives (e.g. contract protocols, commercialism) Unequaled learning and networking opportunities for the contracting & commercial community IACCM's Americas Forum comes around only once a year!  Where else can you… Connect with cross-industry and cross-functional colleagues Brainstorm issues impeding your organization’s strategic contracting progress and Contemplate and plan your next steps… And that’s just a tip of the iceberg…You will be energized and geared with the knowledge to champion value-focused change! Join us - Registration is now open Pricing Options*Corporate Member rate includes a 30% discount on the standard Full Member rate Registration Options Individual Member Rate Corporate Member* Rate Non/Renewing Member Rate (includes 1 year IACCM Membership) Full Event Pass (Incl. Optional Workshops & Awards Dinner) $1,695 $1,187 $1,845 Full Event Pass Plus Academic Forum $1,695 $1,187 $1,845 Qualified Academic Pass (Incl. Full Event Pass & Academic Forum)** $995 NA $1,145   *A 30% discount applies to those who are part of an active corporate membership. The discounted price will automatically be listed when you register. If in doubt about your membership status, please contact info@iaccm.com. Contact Katherine Kawamoto to learn more about starting a Corporate Membership. **Discounts available to FULL-TIME Academics only, please contact info@iaccm.com for details. ***No other discount offers can be combined    

Read More...

IACCM Annual Europe Forum 2014 - Copenhagen

Join us at the 2014 IACCM Europe Forum! Visit www.iaccm.com/europe for program and speaker details. Pricing Details:*Corporate Member rate includes a 30% discount on the standard Full Member rate Registration Options Individual Member Rate   Corporate Member* Rate   Non/Renewing Member Rate (includes 1 year IACCM Membership!) Full Event Pass (Incl. optional Workshops or Academic Forum) EUR 1242 EUR 870 EUR 1392 Qualified Academic Pass** (incl. Full event pass & Academic Forum) EUR 750 NA EUR 900 *A 30% discount applies to those who are part of an active corporate membership. The discounted price will automatically be listed when you register. If in doubt about your membership status, please contact info@iaccm.com. Contact Diane Kilkenny to learn more about starting a Corporate Membership. **Discounts available to FULL-TIME Academics only, please contact info@iaccm.com for details. CallSend SMSAdd to SkypeYou'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype

Read More...

Top Negotiated Terms Survey

Hola a todos ! Conforme lo anticipara Tim Cummins, el CEO de la IACCM, la encuesta sobre los TOP NEGOTIATED TERMS durante el 2013 está a punto de cerrar, pero AUN ESTAMOS A TIEMPO DE SUMAR EL APORTE DESDE CENTRO Y SUD AMERICA e IBERIA (ESPAÑA Y PORTUGAL). Este estudio es utilizado por profesionales de varios países e industrias ya que es una herramienta útil a la hora de planificar la negociación y diseñar las políticas internas. Como nos dice Tim en su mensaje en inglés que retransmito a continuación, el estudio de este año está a punto de ser finalizado pero a la IACCM le interesa especialmente nuestro aporte desde los países de habla hispana y portuguesa, esto es, España, Portugal, Centro y Sud América. Participa, ya mismo, son apenas unos minutos, cliqueando aqui: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2103topten y recibirás un resultado personalizado en las próximas dos semanas. Gracias ! Pablo IACCM's study of the most frequently negotiated terms is used by professionals in many countries and industries to help their negotiation planning and to influence internal policies. The current survey is nearing completion, but we would especially like more input from South and Central America. I would very much appreciate if you could take a few minutes to provide your experiences. The survey can be accessed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2103topten As a contributor, you receive a personal copy of the research report; your input will of course be kept confidential. Sincerely, Tim Cummins CEO, IACCM

Read More...
 

Acércate y échale un vistazo a la nueva página de la IACCM

La has visitado ya? Échale un vistazo a la nueva página de la IACCM y, en particular, a la de nuestra Comunidad en Español: https://www.iaccm.com/gp/espanol

Read More...

2013 IACCM Innovation Award Winners - Case Studies

Hear from the winners of the 2013 IACCM Innovation Awards, and discover how they have raised the profile of contract and commercial capability within their organizations. Selected from 68 valid entries, from organizations large and small, public and private, and including many of the world's top brands, IACCM is pleased to recognize the 4 winners of the 2013 edition of the Innovation Awards.

Read More...

Redacción y contratación en múltiples idiomas

Comparto con Ustedes mi último artículo (en inglés) en "Contracting Excellence", donde abordo el tema de la redacción y negociación en múltiples idiomas. Seguramente estaremos acercando el texto en español próximamente, pero me interesaría escuchar sus comentarios desde Latinoamérica y España. https://www.iaccm.com/news/contractingexcellence/?storyid=1532&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CE_January_2014+Americas&utm_content=CE_January_2014+Americas+CID_8a7d09a845a550e5e08252753959d454&utm_source=Campaign%20Monitor&utm_term=Need%20a%20dual%20language%20contract%20Heres%20how Para ver la "newslettter" íntegramente: https://www.iaccm.com/news/contractingexcellence/?id=139 Need a dual language contract? Here's how By Pablo Cilotta, International Senior Legal Counsel & Head of Contract Management (HR - EMEA & Latin America) Having managed legal and contractual matters in multiple jurisdictions, I have heard many professionals based in the US and UK raise this question. Let’s say you are planning to support international expansion of your business into Spanish speaking or other countries, but you’re concerned about drafting and negotiation in multiple languages. If you are a global head of contract management or general counsel of a US or European multinational, you likely want to know the obstacles and how to avoid them. Indeed, if we advise companies with operations across multiple geographies or with several business units in the world, we usually face the need to draft, review and negotiate contracts in other languages. For example, you could be doing this when closing sales with foreign companies, appointing sales agents or distributors who need agreements drafted in other languages rather than English or when acknowledging services or employment agreements with parties that perform services overseas. This article explores contract drafting and negotiation in multiple languages, from the perspective, mainly, of Spanish-speaking countries. It includes awareness of cross-cultural and language differences, and explores the appropriateness of undertaking a dual language contract model. It does not include legal advice or propose a ‘right answer’ for all purposes, because each must be decided case-by-case. Be accurate – errors cost money, trust! Recent IACCM research reveals several areas where unintentional but substantial misunderstandings can occur, if we are not aware of cultural norms or expressions. It can be embarrassing and costly. In fact, an article in Tim Cummins’ blog Commitment Matters stresses the need for clarity in communication during negotiations. Particularly when dealing internationally, misunderstandings happen easily. Plain language makes translation easier Wholeness of the message, its presentation, accuracy and consistency are all more than relevant, but the main benefit of a well-written contract is its clarity. Business leaders don´t speak technical-legal language, so it is important to draft contracts in terms that are easy to understand, using plain language and avoiding legalese. If this is done, translation into a local language will be much easier. Keeping paragraphs short, dividing the contract into sections with clear sentences, preferring active voice over passive, avoiding multiple negatives etc- all help with clarity in contract drafting, including for translation purposes. Beware of cross-cultural differences In his article, David James, author of Cross-Cultural and language training states “Global competition is too great to wing it when you go abroad. Savvy business people learn about the specific cultural differences for each country where they do business. And the differences are significant.” When managing cross-border functions in multinationals, we must be prepared to explore diversity in multi-disciplinary teams, identifying the impact of cultural differences in drafting and negotiating international agreements. For instance, contract management professionals need to have cross-cultural understanding and training to properly manage choice of law and arbitration and understand how to deal with translations of contracts into foreign languages. But, recent IACCM research indicates that many American companies fail to focus attention on local culture or language differentiation when expanding into new regions. Worse, during turbulent economic periods, companies often cut the language, international business and cross-cultural training programs once offered to employees. We must understand the mindset of the people and companies we deal with overseas, and always get local advice on whether or not local laws require mandatory provisions in certain circumstances. Contract Management in Latin America – its growth and current impact Lately we have seen contract management beginning to emerge as a recognized profession in Latin America, although still in the early stages of development. Contract management roles are not common in South America. In general, project management, procurement or sales perform these functions. Lawyers manage the drafting and negotiation phase if the company requires in-house support. Otherwise, it becomes the responsibility of the finance jurisdiction. That said, small or medium size companies that assign contract drafting to external lawyers are exposed to risks when they must negotiate a contract in a foreign language, such as English. These lawyers probably do not know the business as they should, even without 100% domain of the English language. I have seen this happen with small organizations in Spain and certain Latin American countries. The contract template brought by the supplier from the US or Europe, in its English version, is taken overseas. Then customers in Latin America or Spain - who anticipate reviewing and negotiating in English - find they cannot. Result? An incredible waste of time creating translations, unexpected costs, extra work, having misunderstandings and experiencing the need to review a contract already reviewed. Narrowing the legal gap – the good news The legal system adopted in Latin American countries – as well as in France, Italy, Germany, Spain and other countries - is civil law, also known as the Continental European Law system. Its foundation is the French Napoleonic Code and the old Roman system, as opposed to thecommon law of the Anglo-Saxon community. With this traditional gap narrowing, Latin American practitioners have been developing new business models that recognize the increasing importance of common law. The gap no longer affects us as much. Obviously this is a great help when negotiating international contracts. Choice of language – the challenge One of the first things you must evaluate when doing business with foreign parties is whether the agreement should be in English, or the foreign language or both. American corporations doing business abroad require English as the official language for the contract. But English is not always the best choice. For instance, if our goal is to have a potential dispute resolution in a jurisdiction or arbitration forum where arbitrators do not conduct proceedings in English, then without any doubt the choice of contract language will be the other language, not English. Avoid dual language if possible Multilingual contract models can be extremely dangerous and we could run severe risks when transplanting and adapting foreign legal concepts. I would always try to avoid dual-language contracts. My first choice would be to migrate Spanish customers to English, depending on the customers’ size and structure and the circumstances of the transaction. Are we selling to a small or medium client? How big are we? Are we buying or acknowledging an alliance partner agreement? It’s critically important to make a comprehensive assessment and then decide to either migrate them to English or create a dual-language system. If we migrate customers to English we can still discuss issues in local language (via phone, face-to-face meetings, email) while keeping contract templates and reviewing other parties’ concerns exclusively in English. In this case, both parties must understand that only the English language will dominate, because only one version of the contract exists in English. The other language will be a translation for information only. If this option does not match the other party’s expectations, we have no choice but to implement the dual-language model. If a dual language contract is necessary, companies with overseas operations sometimes use a two-column, side-by-side format in the contract, depending on the country. This type of contract is common when dealing with customers, vendors or partners with subsidiaries or operations in Spanish-speaking countries, as well as Chinese, Korean, Arabic, Ukrainian, Russian and other Eastern European local languages and, to a lesser extent, Italian and German. Which language controls? First, in case of conflict between both languages, it is essential to consider which will have priority. The question is which language is the official one? Which is binding? Which will control? The agreement needs to be extremely clear. It should state that the original version is in a certain language (eg English) and if a conflict or discrepancy occurs between the languages, one of them shall prevail and take precedence over the other. For example, a clause might have the following wording: “This agreement is in both languages, English and Spanish. In the event of any inconsistency, the English version is the original language and the Spanish version is a translation for information purposes only. Then in case of conflict, the English version will prevail and will therefore be the binding version for both parties…” Applicable law It is best if both the English and foreign language versions of the contract state which of these versions controls. If neither version states which one controls, then the foreign language version will normally prevail in a local court and the local law will apply if different interpretation criteria or discrepancies occur. Regardless of what the English language version states, always be aware of what the foreign language contract says as well. Conduct a clause-by-clause review to ensure translation quality Recent exchanges in our IACCM forum show the importance of making sure about the quality of translation. You must ensure that you have an accurate translation of the contract. One of the two options below can be used to perform a clause-by-clause review: Proven independent law firms with international network connections and domain in multiple geographies or Official translation companies or individuals with demonstrable experience in translating legal terms and conditions. A case in point … Some years ago I experienced the following incident in Spain proving the importance of quality in translations. The relationship and negotiations were in Spanish. The subsidiary drafted a Spanish version of the contract by literally translating into Spanish the English version of the terms and conditions. A secretary (non-lawyer) performed the translation. But unfortunately, and by accident, the negotiators signed the contract with a provision that stated the need to conduct arbitration in Houston, Texas. The contract was between two legal entities based in Spain, and had no contact point in Texas! Fortunately, no conflict or discrepancy occurred, but many complications could have resulted. A conflict would have generated additional non-expected costs and time. The company had no opportunity to remove a clause. Also, in Texas, a translation of a foreign-language document would only have been admissible in court or arbitration proceedings if the document had been accompanied by a sworn affidavit from a qualified translator. The affidavit would be required to specify the translator’s qualifications and attest that the translation was fair and accurate Conclusion – keep this as a checklist Clarity in communication and plain language is essential in contract drafting, especially when dealing internationally. We must pay attention to cross-cultural and language differences. Evaluate if the agreement should be in English, the foreign language or both. Try to avoid dual-language contracts. Insist on a “migration” of non-English speaking clients to English, but keep meetings, phone calls, conversations and follow-up procedures in the local language. If you must implement a dual-language model, state which language controls and governs. Consider both choice of law and jurisdiction at the beginning of negotiations. Find out if the contract provides for dispute resolution, choice of forum or jurisdiction or international arbitration. If no provision exists, assess which legal forum is best for the business. If it is a non-English-speaking forum, assume that the foreign language prevails. Consider the objectives and agree on the contract language that makes sense with such a dispute resolution clause, if any. Use an in-house contract manager or legal counsel who understands both languages. Either get external legal advice to review the contract according to local law or hire a translation company or professional with expertise in technical-legal vocabulary. Consider the time and legal fees to be spent in drafting dual language contracts. Specify the currency to be applied to the contract and consider that local specific issues can impact contract performance. Remember to state that the language that controls will also be the official language during the post-award contract management stage. The controlling language must be stated as the language of subsequent change requests between the parties. Finally, have the contract signed by both parties. If it is a dual-language model, each party signs each version. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Pablo Cilotta is a bilingual (Spanish & English) in house legal counsel with background in corporate and business law, commercial contracts, employment agreements and HR generalist profile. He has business presence in Europe (Spain); Middle East and Africa; APAC; LATAM (Argentina); and the US market. Within that global presence, his experience includes many industries like the fishery sector, IT industry, law firm consultant. His core specialties include setting up legal entities and subsidiaries, demonstrating expertise in designing, drafting, implementing, reviewing and negotiating contracts, including technology license and channel partner. TO CONTACT THE AUTHOR, please mail your question to Info IACCM or connect using the IACCM Member Search (login required).

Read More...
 

ENCUESTA / Estudio anual sobre los términos contractuales más negociados a nivel mundial‏ //IMPORTANTE PARTICIPACION DE LATINOAMERICA y ESPAÑA / IACCM

La IACCM lanza hoy su tradicional estudio anual, en su 12da edición, sobre los términos contractuales más negociados a nivel mundial. Este único y exclusivo análisis es utilizado por empresas y asesores globalmente, a fin de informarse, desarrollar e implementar nuevas estrategias contractuales y de negociación. Es la encuesta más conocida de la asociación pero para ello es esencial tu ayuda. La encuesta lleva menos de 10 minutos. Te preguntaremos sobre las cláusulas contractuales que negocias con mayor frecuencia y asimismo tu visión sobre ciertas tendencias en el proceso de negociación. Por el simple hecho de colaborar con esta encuesta, recibirás con prioridad los resultados de la medición, sin perjuicio de contribuir con el estudio de las perspectivas y situación actual de nuestra comunidad profesional. Los resultados del estudio ofrecen elementos esenciales para comprender diferentes perspectivas -jurisdiccional, geográfica y en razón de la industria- asegurándose de tal modo que pueda ser utilizada inmediatamente y puesta en práctica usual, generándose así nuevas ideas y tendencias en el entorno complejo que la negociación ofrece en nuestros dias. Muchas gracias por tu participación. A continuación el link para contribuir con nuestra encuesta: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2103topten

Read More...

Resultado elecciones Junta Directores IACCM 2014

Comparto con Ustedes los resultados de las elecciones para la Junta de Directores de la IACCM 2014. Los 22 candidatos representaron 12 industrias diferentes y 10 nacionalidades. Un final muy cerrado en la votación ha dejado la integración de la nueva junta de la siguiente manera, remarcando en "negritas" a quienes han sido recientemente elegidos o renovaron su mandato. Felicitaciones a todos! Pablo Margaret Smith - Chair Executive Director- Contract Management and Director of Operations-Legal - Accenture KB Monu Iyappa - Independent Consultant Gianmaria Riccardi - Director, Commercial Business Management Europe - Cisco System Italia Srl Coen Wilms - Group Contracting Discipline Manager - Royal Dutch Shell Lucy Bassli - Assistant General Counsel - GCO Manager - Microsoft Jerry Jacobson - Global Process Advisor - Contracting - Chevron Arne Byberg - Associate General Counsel - Hewlett-Packard Co. Barbara Chomicka - Senior Project Manager - EC Harris LLP Kai Jacob - Process Manager and Head of Global Contract Management Services, Legal Department Manager - SAP Andy Kerstan - Global Contracts Manager - Rio Tinto Dan Mahlebashian - Chief Contracting Officer - General Motors M.C. McBain - Vice President Global Business Development - IBM Timothy McCarthy - Director, Contracts & Pricing - Rockwell Automation Nick Nayak - CPO - Department of Homeland Security Alan Schenk - Vice President for Common Process, Contracting and Compliance for Exploration and Production - BP Peter Woon VP, Procurement and Supply Chain - Marina Bay Sands.

Read More...

Elección de Junta de Directores de la IACCM - 2013

Sabido es que una de las principales razones del éxito de la IACCM radica en la elección de su Junta de Directores, la cual refleja las necesidades e intereses de todos los miembros de la asociación. Es momento de elegir la nueva integración de la Junta de Directores de la IACCM para el período 2013 – 2014 / La elección se lleva a cabo del 18 de noviembre al 8 de Diciembre. Participa entonces en esta votación, eligiendo entre los candidatos postulados en el siguiente link (por orden alfabético), tus propios candidatos hasta un máximo de 6 (seis) posiciones. Para conocer mayores detalles sobre los candidatos e instrucciones de cómo votar, ver en inglés el siguiente link: http://www.iaccm.com/members/boardelections/ Como verás, este año los postulantes provienen de 7 países diferentes y de 15 sectores industriales, algunos de los cuales ya son miembros de la junta y van por su reelección, mientras que otros candidatos se postulan por primera vez. Es probable que no conozcas personalmente o en detalle a los nominados, por lo cual cada uno de ellos nos ha acercado, en inglés, un breve repaso de sus antecedentes, así como también su propuesta de objetivos que tendrá en cuenta en caso de resultar elegidos. Seguramente te identificarás con alguno de ellos y sentirás que uno o varios candidatos reflejan tus intereses e ideas. Es ésta una votación anónima, y si bien el sistema registrará la circunstancia que tu has votado (para evitar doble sufragio), no guarda constancia alguna sobre tu elección concreta. Por favor, indica tu voto por cada uno de los seleccionados, cliqueando la casilla que se encuentra al lado de tus candidatos. Recuerda que puedes votar hasta un máximo de 6 (seis). Una vez que hayas culminado tu voto, cliquear en “Submit Vote”. En caso de duda, escribir a info@iaccm.com Recuerda: La elección comienza el 18 de noviembre y finaliza el 8 de diciembre, siendo publicados los resultados el 10 de diciembre. Muchas gracias en nombre de nuestro CEO, Tim Cummins Un saludo cordial, Pablo.-

Read More...
 

Interesante artículo de María Arraiza en "Contracting Excellence"

Les acerco el link de la última edición de "Contracting Excellence", en inglés, en el que encontrarán un interesante artículo de Maria Arraiza-Monteux sobre el Contract Manufacturing Management process: http://www.iaccm.com/news/contractingexcellence/?id=137

Read More...

Claridad en la comunicación

En su blog "Commitment Matters", Tim Cummins se ha referido últimamente al costo generado por la comisión de errores en la redacción de contratos. Sin duda, aquellos que negocian de manera regular son conscientes de la necesidad de que exista CLARIDAD en la COMUNICACIÓN y en particular cuando se trata de negociaciones contractuales multi-jurisdiccionales y/o a nivel internacional, en las que existe alta probabilidad de malentendidos. Tim Cummins tuvo ocasión de abordar este punto en un webinar con Karen Walch, docente de la Escuela de Gestión Global Thunderbird, en cuya oportunidad se planteó un relevamiento y revisión de una investigación reciente de la IACCM en relación a la negociación internacional y multi-cultural. Allí se dejó expresamente reconocido que existen varias áreas en las cuales puede existir la posibilidad de errores involuntarios de importancia en la interpretación de la voluntad querida por las partes, por lo que resulta esencial a efectos de evitar malentendidos, que estemos al corriente de expresiones, giros idiomáticos y prácticas culturales. Varios aspectos del tema en análisis tendrán inevitablemente, como es sabido, un fuerte impacto en la confianza. Así como un país entero puede resultar castigado por su falta de apertura u honestidad, cuando quizás el problema es generado en razón de incompatibilidades con estándares lingüísticos o de conducta, lo propio puede pasar en una relación contractual bilateral. Esto puede deberse a la gran brecha que puede existir en los criterios de interpretación de estándares y valores en temas tales como los derechos de propiedad intelectual, para citar un ejemplo. Así las cosas, es probable que los negociadores a menudo experimenten un falso sentimiento de seguridad al negociar en su idioma nativo, pero no debemos tomar ésto como regla general ya que cada uno de nosotros utiliza expresiones y términos en nuestro propio contexto cultural, aún cuando el idioma sea aparentemente el mismo. Un ejemplo interesante ha sido publicado por la prensa británica hace unos dias (en particular, por el "Daily Telegraph") al hacer una reseña de expresiones británicas comunes vertidas en medios masivos de comunicación y redes sociales, haciendo notar cómo aquellos que hablan el mismo idioma inglés (en este caso, los americanos), aún pueden interpretar algo diferente. Ver los ejemplos -en versión original, en inglés- que se copian a continuación. Lo propio pasa con el castellano y sus diferentes acepciones, con mayor razón si comparamos los regionalismos entre los países latinoamericanos y la misma Madre Patria. Ejemplos? Lo abrimos al debate, sería interesante que cada uno aportara algo similar al cuadro anterior pero entre el español de la península ibérica y el castellano hablado desde el Río Grande en México hasta Tierra del Fuego en Argentina.

Read More...

'Cloud Computing' (la nube): el desafío de la integración aprendiendo de la Nube

El auge de la nube (“cloud computing”) como asimismo de “SaaS” (Software as a Service) ha reducido de manera sustancial los costos iniciales de aplicaciones informáticas, haciendo más simples las decisiones de compra de herramientas y facilitando el uso y adopción de las mismas. No obstante, este fenómeno nos pasa una factura, ya que ha hecho del control centralizado de compra informática una verdadera pesadilla. Por qué? Veamos... Hemos llegado al extremo que son los mismos empleados quienes suelen buscar sus propias soluciones... También, que las unidades de negocio se descargan aplicaciones para cubrir sus necesidades específicas... A todo esto, y en forma poco proactiva, encontramos al CIO de la empresa en estado permanente de búsqueda de información para mantenerse al tanto de dichas descargas. Con el transcurso del tiempo, esta actividad, tan poco controlada, terminará opacando las ventajas comparativas que la "nube" implica por sí misma en materia de costos. Es cierto. Pero lo que resulta más importante es que constituye un desafío sustancial a la capacidad del negocio de integrar datos y sistemas. Varios artículos recientes han destacado este dilema que ahora confronta a los CIOs de las empresas con los costos derivados de la integración de diversas aplicaciones actualmente en uso. Los negocios deben encontrar un nuevo equilibrio entre la flexibilidad, la satisfacción inmediata de las necesidades de los usuarios y la innovación que Cloud y SaaS ofrecen, frente a las posibles ineficiencias que las mismas representan. La situación nos recuerda en gran medida al reto que se les presenta a otras funciones centrales de la empresa, tales como el área de Legales, Compras y Contract Management, quienes también se enfrentan al reto de un negocio que les exige mayor celeridad, flexibilidad e innovación, al mismo tiempo que se requiere cumplir con "Compliance", reducción de costos y preservación del valor de la marca. También surgen conflictos entre la la necesidad de atribuir localmente facultades y la integración general, confrontación ésta que nos enseña que sin duda se debe encontrar un nuevo equilibrio entre dichas variables. Para la IACCM, la mejor manera de lograr este objetivo es con la aparición de centros de especialización y conocimiento que consideren al trabajo no desde la perspectiva del control, sino con un énfasis en el otorgamiento de nuevas facultades y capacidades, dándoles más control y poder sobre su entorno. Deberán estos centros de especialización aplicar su conocimiento profundo para desarrollar y comunicar prácticas y políticas apropiadas para el negocio. Así, deberán hacerse responsables de la actualización de estas reglas a fin de asegurar que las mismas se mantengan alineadas a las necesidades del mercado, como así también que las herramientas y sistemas estén correctamente en funcionamiento. Debemos aceptar que las tecnologías en materia de comunicaciones y redes están transformando el planeta. Es éste recién el inicio del camino y el cambio continuo será inevitable, pero la prioridad, hoy, es abrir bien nuestros ojos y darnos cuenta que todo a nuestro alrededor está cambiando... y debemos también nosotros sumarnos a esa migración.

Read More...
 

"Contract Templates" - Modelos de Contratos

Los “templates” o modelos de contrato y su gestión es un tema sobre el cual no se ha escrito con mucha frecuencia, por lo menos en forma sistemática y académica, y menos aún en español, tal como se ha apuntado en ciertos eventos recientes organizados por la IACCM en Europa. Entre los puntos más importantes del tema merecen destacarse en primer término en qué medida los modelos generan rigidez e inflexibilidad y, en segundo lugar, si tiene sentido determinar un “template” corporativo si finalmente la empresa negocia con terceros que imponen sus propias cláusulas contractuales. En ambos casos, la IACCM considera que el problema radica en la errónea consideración del rol de los modelos de contrato como parte de un proceso y estrategia de Contract Management. Los “templates” no debieran importar una imposición estática o rígida, debiendo los mismos reflejar la realidad del negocio y los propósitos de la organización. Ello trae aparejado la necesidad de un ajuste regular y el reconocimiento de que ellos transmiten principios y no reglas absolutas. Los buenos modelos de contrato son integrados en el marco de un proceso en el que se monitorean las transformaciones en el mercado, las necesidades comerciales y las circunstancias particulares del momento, siendo auditadas y ajustadas de manera regular. Cuentan asimismo con el soporte de niveles de relevancia de capacitación y entrenamiento, como por ejemplo, el uso de retroalimentación y alternativas posibles al negociar los contratos impuestos por terceros. Los modelos contractuales existen para determinar un punto de partida predeterminado, sin los cuales un negocio sería menos eficiente o más riesgoso. Pero como ocurre con cualquier otro instrumento comercial, deben ser desarrollados de manera conjunta por varias áreas de la empresa y mantenerse flexibles sujetos a las cambios imperantes. Proximamente la IACCM organizará un webinar relativo a las “Mejores Prácticas en la Creación y Gestión de Modelos Contractuales”. En caso de resultar interesado, no dudes en hacérnoslo saber. Un saludo,

Read More...

Desarrollando cláusulas contractuales

Para muchas empresas el proceso de desarrollo de cláusulas contractuales y de elección de las políticas y procedimientos aplicables constituye una actividad interna tediosa y muy extensa. Puede haber alguna referencia a normas de la industria, comparaciones con estándares de la competencia, asesoramiento de profesionales tercerizados o influencia de un consultor externo, pero para la mayoría, los términos contractuales tienen a evolucionar en base a la discusión entre las partes interesadas internas. Una empresa miembro de la IACCM organizó recientemente un evento al que invitó a sus propios clientes, evento que se desempeñó bajo el título “Alcanzando valor a través de una mejor contratación”. Intrigado por la información publicada por la IACCM en relación a los costos de la pobre contratación (costos que impactaron negativamente tanto al cliente como al proveedor), esta empresa miembro de la IACCM decidió que la mejor manera de generar una mejora de sus términos contractuales usuales era a través de una discusión abierta, en presencia de sus propios clientes y no vía negociaciones individuales. A ese propósito, se organizó un evento de aproximadamente 40 participantes provenientes de las áreas de Compras, Finanzas y legales de algunos de sus clientes más importantes. La agenda de este evento, al fue invitado el CEO de la IACCM, Tim Cummins, como moderador, cubría un buen número de cláusulas específicas, así como también temas relacionados con contratos. Uno de los puntos tratados fue el de las “Condiciones de pago y facturación”, habiéndose analizado asimismo los resultados de una investigación de la IACCM en relación al enfoque tradicional de las empresas participantes. Pero no es de extrañar que el tema relativo a la distribución de riesgos fuera el que generó el debate más animado del encuentro. El contenido de información facilitada por la IACCM en esta materia, junto a las experiencias compartidas por un importante consultor, resultaron de gran utilidad para los participantes en aras de aprovechar las ventajas de un enfoque más matizado y equilibrado en relación a los términos contractuales relativos a los riesgos, en base a los objetivos perseguidos. Esto trajo como consecuencia que en las jornadas más avanzadas del evento se indagara en profundidad sobre algunos términos contractuales que causaban pérdida de valor en los contratos. Se organizó también una presentación en mesa redonda donde se discutieron posibles nuevas alternativas, como por ejemplo, el mejor uso de las tecnologías digitales en la formación del contrato y en su comunicación y distribución interna, así como también modelos contractuales basados en la consecución de objetivos o en el desempeño de los mismos. Antes del evento existía cierto nerviosimos sobre el hecho de hacer participar a los clientes junto a la empresa organizadora de este foro. "Quizás comiencen a protestar o comparar nuestro desempeño con el de la competencia? Quizás se unan en nuestra contra durante el evento o luego del mismo en busca de nuevas perspectivas?" Al final, ninguno de estos temores se hizo realidad. Por el contrario, los clientes tuvieron una nueva apreciación del impacto e influencia de la elección de los términos contractuales. Sintieron que sus voces fueron escuchadas y, en general, los términos contractuales no constituyeron a partir de entonces un tema tabú, sino una fuente reconocida de valor agregado en la relación comercial. Para el organizador del evento, los beneficios fueron múltiples. Incorporaron un inestimable conocimiento del mercado, crearon una relación con el cliente más estrecha, sembraron futuras reducciones en el ciclo de negociación contractual, mejoraron la cooperación con Ventas e incrementaron el entendimiento y comprensión por parte de la Alta Dirección del rol y misión del área de Contract Management.

Read More...
 

The Future of Contracting

This report is based upon research undertaken by IACCM during 2011, through a number of dedicated surveys and interviews that in total gathered opinions from more than 700 practitioners and executives. The views of contract and commercial managers, lawyers, procurement and supply chain executives were supplemented by those of academics, consultants and business managers from across industry and within multiple countries. The report consolidates those views, including selective quotes, and also reflects the broader trends and experiences of the IACCM leadership team that interacts with its worldwide cross-industry membership on a daily basis.

Read More...

El rol del Gerente de Contratos (nueva edición) - 14 de Abril de 2009

Blog escrito por Tim, reviendo el contenido de blogs anteriores. Publicado el 14 de abril de 2009

Read More...

Risk, Value Creation & Contract Management

'Contract management is increasingly at the center of our business strategies .... Practitioners today are being called upon to achieve a balance between risk and value creation.'These are the words of Alan Schenk, Vice President of Common Process, Contracting & Integration at BP Exploration and Production. In this 5 minute podcast, Alan outlines the critical role that contract management plays in today's oil and gas industry and discusses the drivers for its increased performance and challenges this creates for skills.Alan also explains why BP will have a team of its professionals participating at the next IACCM conference in London - 'Complex Projects & The Role of Contracts'.To learn more about the IACCM EMEA Conference, please go to http://www.iaccm.com/emea

Read More...
 

El rol del Gerente de Contratos (22 de agosto 2011)

(blog escrito por Tim el 22 de agosto de 2011)

Read More...

Una historia de éxito

Cuando comento con equipos de gestión contractual y comercial sobre la potencialidad de agregar valor a determinados procesos contractuales, mientras algunos se muestran entusiasmados por el tema, hay quienes me miran perplejos, carentes de opinión sobre el tema.

Read More...
 
 
Community Members
Showing subscriptions for the past three days. View all community members
Aznar, Beatriz  
Atos Spain, S.A.